Micro from Switzerland has been designing scooters for a long time now. If you have gone past any primary school or to seaside towns like Skegness then you have probably seen them being ridden and sold to children across the UK and the rest of the world.

Because of that, scooters have long had a rep for being great transport options for children, however, Micro also has plans to design scooters for adults, the first of which is their new electric scooter, the Emicro One.

You wouldn’t notice much difference between the Emicro and the other scooters from Micro at first glance, it features a very similar design until you look closer. One big giveaway are the four battery indicator LEDs that light up on the deck as you ride it.

As you do ride the scooter you will notice the other big giveaway, and that is the electric motor.

Situated within the rear wheel of the Emicro One, it provides a boost of power whenever you kick to move the speaker. This is ‘assisted scooting’, which means that you do have to put some work into it, however, once you do get the power going you can quite easily zip up and down roads with just the occasional light push of your foot, or by putting your body weight forward.

With it, you can hit up to 25km/h or around 15mph, which is extremely fast for just a couple of small wheels, making the scooter extremely fun to use and quite scary at the same time. It also removes the burden of having to overwork yourself just to get up a hill thanks to its automatic power adjustment.

The speeds that you can achieve are also quite customisable via three different modes, Eco, Standard, and Sport.

Eco mode will output 250 watts of power for 15 km/h speeds, standard will output 250 watts but at 25 km/h speeds and sport mode will provide a little more torque via 500 watts of power output for up to 25 km/h speeds.

Slowing down or stopping this power output is the same as any normal scooter, simply press down the pedal at the rear of the scooter, at which point, the motor will switch off and transfer any remaining momentum back into the battery via regenerative breaking.

It’s all rather quick.

Having an electric scooter does mean that you need to note one thing, hoping off the scooter while the motor is assisting your ride will result in the scooter taking off without you, which can be rather strange if you are used to hopping off to stop a scooter, however, you soon get used to it.

On top of that, because of the sheer speed of the scooter, the ride can be somewhat uncomfortable on roads that are not as smooth due to the lack of suspension, however, they have reduced that feeling somewhat via the dual-material wheels.

The legality of an electric-powered scooter is also a bit of a grey area and if it is considered to be the same as a hoverboard then riding the scooter on any public roads would be considered the same.

Micro says the following about it:

Riding self-propelled scooters on the pavement isn’t illegal and as the emicro one scooter is part electric and part push controlled it does not fall under the banned bylaws. However, it is advisable to ride on private property only.

And despite it looking like an ordinary scooter, it does act very different, producing a high-pitch whine as it moves along the pavement, but you can triple-tap the brake pedal to deactivate the motor and scoot on as normal, but doing that does kinda miss the point of buying such a scooter, especially one that does come with such a price tag.

If you do have a huge private land or decide to use on the roads anyway, despite the potential illegal aspects of it then you will be happy to know that the Emicro One has a pretty substantial battery pack.

Stating a specific range would be hard, given that this depends on how hard you push, what surfaces you are riding on, the hills that you are riding up, and the temperature of the place that you are riding within, however, Micro say that it should last for around 10-15km from a full charge, thankfully, getting juice back into the battery is pretty quick and it charges to full capacity in just about an hour.

Micro does recommend that you charge this battery at least once every 3 months to prevent degradation and they recommend that you have the scooter serviced every couple of years. For that, the battery does come with a one-year warranty or for up to 1,000 cycles. The rest of the scooter has a two-year warranty.

And despite this huge battery, the scooter is actually quite lightweight. At 7.5kg it’s just around 2kg heavier than your average scooter and because it does fold up, it’s pretty easy to carry onto public transport, however, we wouldn’t recommend carrying it for longer than a short distance such as through a train station.

To sum all of this up, if you want an electric scooter than the Emicro One is a fantastic option, it’s speedy has great control and looks a lot smarter and refined than the other electric scooters (despite its overuse of logos and icons), however, you do need to think about if you really want an electric scooter.

The legality of such a scooter is unknown at the moment and riding this particular electric scooter can still be a workout due to the fact that the Emicro One only provides an assistive push, during my testing I found this particularly tiresome when riding the scooter and wearing a heavy backpack due to the weight only being supported by one leg.

On top of that, I have particularly large feet (size 14), so it’s not possible for me to comfortably sit both feet on the scooter, onyl having room for a single foot with the other hanging around somewhere else.

It is also pretty expensive for an occasional use form of transport at around £750.

However, despite all of that, if you want an electric scooter than the Emicro One is the best option for you. You can find out more about it on Micro’s webiste.

Disclosure: Micro sent us the Emicro One for the purposes of this review.

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