With the new Fitbit Zip Fitbit have decided to change the game a little from the usual armband found in the Up to a new clip on pedometer that will sync data wirelessly to your laptop, smartphone and even tablet.

The FitBity Zip is extremely tiny, in fact when I first received this in the mail I wondering if I had the right product, pictures really do not show how incredibly small this thing actually is.

On the front of the Zip is an even smaller screen that will display various information as you cycle throw by tapping the display itself, this includes the time, steps, distance traveled, calories burnt and a smiley face that will change depending on how active you have been throughout the day.

One thing however is that there’s no backlighting so the display can be a little hard to see at times, however the display itself isn’t the important part and works well for what you need the device for.

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There’s not much around the back apart from a battery compartment which houses  the included CR 2025 battery that will (according to Fitbit) last between 4-6 months.

The device itself is extremely compact  measuring just 35.5 x 28 x 9.65mm and weighing just 8g, this means you can simply slip it into your pocket alongside all the other tech you may own and it will get to work.

If you prefer however it does come with its own clip on case, made from silicone it can be used to clip the Zip onto your belt or even wristband, which is a much safer way of carrying the device when going out for a jog or just generally walking around the town.

Because of its size when it is clipped on you hardly notice its even there, which is probably one the main things I worried about when first trying out the device.

One thing I should mention is that the Zip is not waterproof and is in fact weatherproof, this means it can take a bit of rain and sweat but will not do too well in the water.

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The main feature of the FitBit Zip however is of course the Fitbit ecosystem which allows you to sync and store all of the information the Zip has collected onto the cloud, which can then be accessed through your laptop, tablet or even smartphone.

This data will also join up with all the other devices from FitBit such as their WiFi scales or the FitBit Activity Tracker this allows you to keep all your data in one account, making it easy to track your progress from various devices.

Syncing works by either plugging in the USB connector to your laptop/PC or through the Activity Tracker app available for the iPhone and Android devices, this will allow you to sync this data over Bluetooth whilst on the move (as long as you have a device with Bluetooth 4.0+) and track how you have been doing.

Within the app you can also add additional details such as the food or drink you have consumed during the day, which can be tracked against targets you have set for yourself.

To start off you are set a goal of 10,000 steps a day, which is just a milestone for you to reach and can be changed easily through both the app and the Fitbit website.

All of the data that is collected during the week will be stored, after which the Fitbit will need to be synced with the application in order to keep track of this information.

Overall the Fitbit Zip is defiantly a great option if you are trying to keep track of your health and maybe even lose some weight or just keep active during the day, for £49.99 it may seem quite expensive but as the device does sync up with  a ton of devices it really is worth it.

However the Zip is defiantly not as much of a fashion statement as bands like the UP or Nike+ FuelBand, the Zip is defiantly aimed at those that are in it for the right reasons not for those who want one because their favorite celebrity wears one.

That being said those other bands do come with a few other features such as sleep tracking, but along with also come with a much higher price tag.

We were sent the Fitbit Zip to review from MobileFun who sell a wide variety of accessory’s from Android accessories all the way to the iPad Mini accessories, all views and opinions within this article were completely my own however.

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