GitHub has today announced some changes to its pricing plans, revealing the new prices at $7 a month for unlimited private repositories, $9 a month per user for organisations, or $25 a month for the first five users.

GitHub will be moving all paid accounts from micro to large to these new plans automatically, with those that are already paying for larger plans getting the credit paid to their account.

For new customers, it has been enabled from today, so if you have been looking to take advantage of some of GiitHub’s paid features then now is definitely the time to do so.

GitHub explains more:

We’ve heard from developers across our community that this new model is a better way to work. We agree—through years of building our business and developing GitHub for you, we’ve seen first hand the advantages of working without private repository limits. We hope you’ll create more repositories, write more code, and keep doing amazing things with GitHub.

If you’re currently paying for one of our organization plans, you’ll have the option to upgrade to unlimited private repositories at any time. For many of you, this change will mean immediate freedom from repository limits and a better way to grow and pay for GitHub.

We want everyone to have a plan with unlimited private repositories, but don’t worry—you are welcome to stay on your current plan while you evaluate the new cost structure and understand how to best manage your organization members and their private repository access. And while we’re currently not enforcing a timeline to move, rest assured that you’ll have at least 12 months notice before any mandated change to your plan.

If you’re using GitHub for private projects, now there’s just one paid plan—unlimited private repositories for $7/month. No matter what you were paying before, your plan now includes as many repositories as you need to work on projects in private—you can even invite a few collaborators.

Over the next few days, we will automatically move all paid accounts, from Micro to Large, to the new plan. If you’re currently paying for one of those larger plans, look out for a prorated credit on your account.

You can read more about this at the source link.

Source: GitHub

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