You may have seen all of those fancy Google Chromebooks hanging around, you want yourself but release that you have only just bought a netbook and don’t want to fork out for a new one. Well, now you don’t have to buy one because you can run Chrome OS on your own netbook.

As Chrome OS is open source, this is even free to do so anyone with spare time can compile their own version of the operating system, the best part though the hard bit has already been done for you, from which Hexxeh has been building Chrome OS builds for some time making them available to the public from here.

This software makes it easy to try out Chrome OS, by running it on a virtual machine, and can be booted from a USB drive to install on a suitable netbook, with dual-boot availabilities.

The best laptops/ netbook that can run Chrome OS are those that have been recently released with x86 capabilities, but success does vary from installation to installation with some lacking wireless or audio features or refusing to wake from sleep mode.

But any Intel Atom system should be okay to use, alongside any Intel Centrino laptops, check out a list of laptops with availabilities here. We tried this with our HP Mini 210 which we did wonder if it would work as it was not on the list but we thought we would give it a go anyway.

To start the installation we got ourselves a blank USB drive which was 4GB, but the minimum of 2GB will do, this is where we will write the Chrome OS image, which can be downloaded here. You will also need some sort of image writing software, which you can download from here, once on the page select the download for your OS.

Once you have downloaded the image writer software you need to open it up and plug your USB in, once the software has loaded select Diskimage and load up the OS you just download, once that is done you will need to boot up your USB and follow the instructions, and you should have Chrome OS running within a few seconds.

What do you think? Did you manage to run Chrome OS on your netbook? Send us a picture and tell us how you did it.

Drop us a line or two in the comments below.

 

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