Personally, I’m not a huge fan of small tablets, don’t get me wrong I’m a fan of tablets just not any under 10 inches, as to be honest I don’t see the point. But when Google announced that they were releasing the Nexus 7 to world, I somehow changed my opinion on them altogether and stated to see the point in a screen this size.

The Nexus 7 will set you back around £199 for the 16GB or £159 for the 8GB version, which is pretty darn cheap when it comes to tablets, but the strange thing is this tablet, in no way feels, well cheap, with brilliant looking packaging alongside the striking design, this is one tablet you should defiantly look into.

Included in the box with the Nexus 7 is a micro-USB cord, charger and the manuals which is all you would expect for a device like this, it would be nice to have some headphones, screen protector or case included, but for the price tag, all is forgiven.

All around the Nexus 7 itself you will notice how well the device has been designed by both Google and ASUS, in a brilliantly inexpensive way. The plastic and glass surrounding are all in the same black/ grey color, and around the edge is a silver trim.

On the back there is the all expected Nexus logo, which actually doesn’t look half bad, which I am pleased with after looking at press photos and wondering how it would turn out, also on the back is a smooth rubbery type finish that makes the Nexus 7 a wonder to hold.

But enough of the outside, it’s time to talk about powering this thing on, which is defiantly one of the best parts about this tablet, as it has a 7 inch HD display with a 1280 x 800 resolution that’s not to be sniffed at, and is something you will begin to notice as soon as you start to use the device.

Every process you make with the tablet is also silky smooth just like butter, which is probably due to the Jelly Bean upgrade that includes a wide variety of performance upgrades, nicknamed ‘Project Butter’.

But it’s not all due to the operating system, as inside the device is a Tegra 3 quad-core chip, which allows you to play some pretty intensive games without lag, or performance issues of any kind.

Alongside it’s Tegra 3 chip the Nexus 7 also supports a GeForce 12-core GPU, 1.2 megapixel front-facing camera, NFC support and 1GB of RAM, within with the only poor part I could find was with the camera, which is where I would have liked to see at least a 5 megapixel camera on the back of this device.

But who uses the rear camera on a tablet anyway…

When testing this device, I found that Android had finally become what it should have been a fair few years ago, everything within Jelly Bean runs perfectly, from moving widgets to playing a game of Mass Effect: Infiltrator  (which is one of the most graphic intensive games available to download on the Google Play Store).

Another thing to make the Nexus 7 even better and boost it’s already high score, is it’s battery life which I found to be pretty amazing, and I found the device to last as long as 10 hours with continuous use during testing, but with normal use the Nexus 7 could easily double that.

Not everything in the Nexus 7 is perfect however, with a few deal breakers emerging as you go down the spec list, the first is the lack of a rear-facing camera, which I found to be a basic in most tablets today, the next is the fact that Google hasn’t even included a camera app for the front-facing camera, which makes it pretty much useless out of the box.

Alongside that there’s no option for 3G connectivity, or even a microSD slot, but if you’re just looking for an entry-based tablet, which this is, you should defiantly pick one of these up, or just wait until the Surface/ iPad Mini? comes out in a few months.

Check out our video review, from our great friend over at the Sneggtech YouTube channel, he has some great videos with awesome tunes (as his tagline says anyway).

This article may include links to affilates, and if you click on one of these affilate links, we may recieve commission.