Back when the original iPod was revealed by Steve Jobs back in 2001, Apple changed the way that people listened to music on the go. Before then, people would struggle with bulky Walkmans and strange “compact” devices.

The original iPod was truly compact and could hold “1,000 songs in your pocket”.

But that wasn’t all down to Apple, they had a lot of help from the Fraunhofer Institute, a company that is based in Germany and was one of the main driving forces behind the development of the MP3 audio format, allowing the iPod to hold those “1,000 songs”.

But after 37 years of service, MP3’s retirement date has been announced.

That’s because the Fraunhofer Institute released a statement today, revealing that they have terminated the licensing for patents and software that relates to the MP3 format, which is pretty sombre news given that MP3 has been around so long, way before broadband or any hi-res devices were launched.

But now we have those modern devices, it is time for a new format that has been created to be used with these new devices with better compression. For some time now that format has been the Advanced Audio Codec (AAC) family, as theFraunhofer Institute explained: “most state-of-the-art media services such as streaming or TV and radio broadcasting use modern ISO-MPEG codecs such as the AAC family”.

So all that we have to say is goodbye MP3, we will also remember those poor download times on dial-up connections.

 

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