Today the European Commission revealed a new proposal of upcoming regulations that would change the way that companies track users on the internet.

At the moment, most companies use Cookies in order to track users across the web, which are small data files that are stored in your browser and then used to remember what you do on the web, this is used to save sign-in information, track a user’s web browsing pattern and even provide a faster web.

Currently, the EU requires websites to state that they use cookies, but the rules on whether this notification should be implied or explicit consent is different around the EU.

The latest proposal from the European Commission would change all of this, requiring companies to get explicit consent from a user before they are allowed to track their online activities, which could be done at the web browser level or at the website level.

This new proposal was announced by the EU on Tuesday in the hope that it would result in a better web browsing experience and more informed users, if it is at the browser level then it might certainly do that, however, things would not be the same if every website was to get explicit consent.

For the consumer, this could bring huge benefits in a variety of ways, however, for companies like Facebook or Google, this could result in less ad revenue, meaning that they would either have to take that as a result, or change how their services work. So that could also bring disadvantages, it could also complicate things for web developers around the world, which could also prove to be a bad thing, and on top of all that, if it is at a browser-level, the user would be forced to change their preferences each time they visit another website, even if they are just adding something to a shopping cart for instance.

If this is passed then the EU plans to put these rules into effect by May 2018, after which any company that does not comply could face fines of up to 4 percent of the global annual sales.

You can read more about the proposal at the source link below.

Source: European Commission

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