Today the Roscosmos cargo ship was set to be launched to resupply the International Space Station (ISS), it launched successfully, however, just 383 seconds into the flight, the third stage of the Soyuz rocket reportedly shut down earlier than planned.

NASA said the following about it on their blog:

Launch of the ISS Progress 65 from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan occurred at 9:51 a.m. EST (8:51 p.m. Baikonur time). An anomaly occurred sometime during the third stage operation. As we get updates from Roscosmos, we will provide them.

The Expedition 50 crew is safe aboard the station. Consumables aboard the station are at good levels.

Roscomos also added the following on their own blog:

Soyuz-U launch vehicle (LV) with cargo spacecraft Progress MS-04 was launched from the BAIKONUR Space Center. The LV flight was normal until 382-d seconds. After 382 seconds of flight the receiving Progress MS-04 telemetry data was stopped. Radar stations did not detect the cargo vehicle Progress MS-04 on the calculated orbit.

According to preliminary information, the contingency took place at an altitude of about 190 km over remote and unpopulated mountainous area of the Republic of Tyva. The most of cargo spacecraft fragments burned in the dense atmosphere. The State Commission is conducting analysis of the current contingency. The loss of the cargo ship will not affect the normal operations of the ISS and the life of the station crew.

The reason for the anomaly occurring is not yet known, but when we do find out when we know for ourselves.

The ship was supposed to resupply the ISS with more than 5,300 pounds of cargo, which included food, water, propellant, and other supplies, however, it should be no reason that this anomaly should affect the ISS as NASA generally schedules cargo flights in a way that accidents like this can happen.

The next ISS resupply mission will be the launch of the H-II Transfer Vehicle (HTV)-6 from the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) on December 9th, after which, NASA has contracts with a number of other space agencies and companies to get more over the course of this year.

At the moment, details are scarce, but we will be updating you as we hear more.

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