You’ll often find spinning hard drives hanging around, despite SSDs being more performant. That’s simply because of the storage that they offer compared.

However, they days may soon be over as Seagate has unveiled their new 60TB SAS SSD, and their 8TB NVMe SSD.

Seagate calls the 60TB version the “highest capacity SSD in the world”, featuring such big storage that it can store the equivalent of 400 million photos or 12,000 DVD movies.

Seagate explains more about the drives:

The 60TB SAS SSD and 8TB Nytro XP7200 NVMe SSD are the newest additions to Seagate’s data center portfolio and are designed to help enterprise IT leaders obtain more value from the rapidly expanding amount of data they must contend with, even under the most demanding application requirements.

The 60TB SAS SSD also simplifies the configuration process of accommodating “hot” and “cold” data, enabling data centers to use the same enterprise HDD 3.5 inch storage form factor. This eliminates the added step of separating out different types of data for near-term availability versus long-term storage — largely based on estimations or best-guesses of future data usage. Instead, data centers can rely on an SSD that helps address their need to quickly accommodate and ensure accessibility of ever-increasing large amounts of data without having to add additional servers or incorporate additional management steps. And, because of the drive’s flexible architecture, it also provides a pathway for data centers to easily grow from the current 60TB capacity to accommodate 100TB of data or more in the future — and all in the same form factor.

Similarly, the 8TB Nytro XP7200 NVMe SSD can accommodate the hyperscale needs of today’s data centers seeking to easily grow with their data without losing the ability to quickly access and process it — a scenario commonly seen in applications involving high performance computing, scale-out databases and big data analytics, such as scientific research and weather modeling.

You can also read more about the new drive at the source link below.

Source: Seagate

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