This week the world’s first full-scale floating wind farm began taking shape off the north-east coast of Scotland, from where it will go on to take its role at the Peterhead wind farm, which is also known as Hywind. We talked about it some time ago here.

Each tower measures 175 metres high including the blades (each of which measures 75 metres), and all of this weighs in at 11,500 tonnes.

The particularly special thing about these wind turbines is that each turbine can operate in water that is up to a kilometre deep, the creators say that each of the blades will also take advantage of their own software, which will hold the tower upright by twisting the blades.

This will effectively dampen the motions from wind, waves, and currents.

Each of these turbines will be a part of a trial that is expected to bring power to up to 20,000 homes.

The wind farm is being manufactured by Statoil, who say that the output from these floating wind turbines will be equal or better than the currently installed turbines around the world, which they hope will help them market and sell it in areas of deep water, particularly in Japan and the west-coast of the US.

Leif Delp, project director for Hywind said the following about the turbine project:

“This is a tech development project to ensure it’s working in open sea conditions. It’s a game-changer for floating wind power and we are sure it will help bring costs down.”

“I think eventually we will see floating wind farms compete without subsidy – but to do that we need to get building at scale.”

One of these giant floating turbines has already been moved into place and another four are awaiting the install in a Norwegian fjord, they aim to install all of these 15 miles off Peterhead, Aberdeenshire by the end of the month.

You can read more about all of this at the links below.

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