In a weird move, it was revealed that YouTube will be blocking music videos from providers who do not agree to its new terms, a situation that is already effecting some of the biggest record labels, who may disappear from YouTube completely after failing to agree to the launch of YouTube’s new subscription service.

The news comes from a report from the Financial Times, who have stated that videos from artists like Adele, Arctic Monkeys and Jack White will disappear in just a few days, which is according to a quote by YouTube’s head of content, Robert Kyncl.

Kyncl continued his statement to The Financial Times with the following: “While we wish that we had 100% success rate, we understand that is not likely an achievable goal and therefore it is our responsibility to our users and the industry to launch the enhanced music experience.”

According to FT, this is part of a planned and upcoming subscription service called ‘Music Pass’, which will charge members of the service a monthly fee in order to watch an unlimited amount of these music videos without ads, offline and on any device, but of course for a fee.

This was confirmed in a statement from a spokesperson speaking to Mashable, who stated:

“We’re adding subscription-based features for music on YouTube with this in mind – to bring our music partners new revenue streams in addition to the hundreds of millions of dollars YouTube already generates for them each year. We are excited that hundreds of major and independent labels are already partnering with us.”

“While the remaining labels, including XL Recordings and Domino, are holding out for a better deal, Kyncl said YouTube is “paying them fairly and consistently with the industry.”

Honestly this all seems a little doggy to me, almost like Google are forcing users to subscribe to its subscription plans (in fact they are), which may seem okay for music, but I wonder where this will end, how long until there’s a “Vlog pass”, a “Gaming Pass”, or even a “Fail video pass”?

In my opinion this clearly shows how much YouTube has become segregated from the people who technically make the site what it is today, something which shouldn’t be the case.

Sources: Financial TimesMashable

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